Japanese idioms and proverbs

Every language has its own beauty which could only be understood by its genuinely dedicated learner, be it native or non-native. Especially, when it comes to expressing a lot in few words, Idioms and Proverbs could best serve the purpose. They are best tools for flaunting one’s extraordinary command on the language without too much effort! If you’re searching for the best institute for learning Japanese language for professional purpose or to clear JLPT tests N5, N4, N3, N2, N1, NAT, the best choice can be DIFL- Dante Institute of Foreign Languages.

In this series of blogs We’re going to discuss few Japanese Idioms and proverbs, advisably  required for all stages of Japanese language learners, Basic or intermediate. 

The importance of these can’t be understood by the students who don’t want to be an adroit in the learnt language or by the teachers who don’t have the will to encourage their students delve deep into the unseen realms of language due to their lack of preparedness or unwillingness.

In this blog we’re gonna introduce you to such idioms and proverbs in Japanese language which have the ability to make you outshine your counterparts with ease! So go ahead and grab this impeccable collection of most commonly used Japanese idioms and proverbs and make them a part of your daily spoken Japanese! For a deeper knowledge in Japanese language, the best institute for learning Japanese language for professional purpose or to clear JLPT tests N5, N4, N3, N2, N1, NAT, the best choice can be DIFL- Dante Institute of Foreign Languages.

Isseki Nicho!
  1. Isseki ni chou 

Literally: Two birds, One throw!

English Meaning: “To kill two birds with one stone” 

Hindi Meaning: “एक् पंथ दो काज / एक् तीर से दो निशाने” (Ek teer se do nishane)

Uma no mimi ni nembutsu !

2. Uma no mimi ni nembutsu 

Literally:  Saying a Buddhist prayer in a horse’s ear 

English Meaning: A wasted effort; “pearls before swine”

Hindi Meaning: “भैंस के आगे बीन बजाना (Bhains ke Aage been bajana)

Notesuma means horse, mimi means ears, nembutsu means Buddhist chants.

Tonari no shibafu wa aoi

3. Tonari no shibafu wa aoi 

Literally: The lawn of the neighbour looks greener 

English Meaning: “The grass is greener on the other side” 

Hindi Meaning : “दूर के ढोल सुहावने” (Door ke diol suhawne)

Notestonari means neighbouring, aoi means green

Neko ni koban!

4. Neko ni koban 

Literally: A coin to a cat 

English Meaning: “Pearls before swine”; ie: don’t offer things to people who are incapable of appreciating them. 

Hindi Meaning- नाच न जाने आँगन टेढ़ा

Notes: A koban was an old gold coin, Neko means a cat.

Nakitsura ni hachi!

5. Nakitsura ni hachi 

Literally: A bee on a crying face 

English meaning: Misfortunes seldom come alone; “When it rains, it pours” 

Hindi meaning: “कंगाली में आटा गीला(Kangali me aata geela)

Notes: naku to cry, and tsura face.

Stay tuned for the next series of Japanese idioms and proverbs with the best institute for learning Japanese language DIFL- Dante Institute of Foreign Languages.

For more details about our Japanese courses call / whatsapp Mr Priyanshu Sharma on 9929-515151 or Mrs Roopshikha Sharma on 931450-2814.

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